Club History

Brief History of

the Rotary Club of Hervey Bay City

On the 16th of August 1984 twenty four business and professional leaders from the Hervey Bay area were presented with a Charter which formed the Rotary Club of Hervey Bay City.

The charter president was Renzo Bonventi and he continues to be a member of The club today. The club’s major focus is towards youth and it was instrumental in the establishment Of the PCYC in Hervey Bay.

This new club joined the worldwide association of Rotary Clubs, known as Rotary International, now consisting of 31,259 Clubs, in 530 Districts in 163 countries with 1,243,4312 Rotarians.

Club Foundation Members 1984, on changeover night July 2007.

A long time coming our first lady member Lesley Barry became a member September 2006

In Fond Memory

Vale….. Trevor Cecil

A Lifetime of service.

Australia Day - Citizen of the year - Trevor Cecil. Long time member of the Rotary Club of Hervey Bay. Trevor Cecil generously donated much of his time to many charities over the years including selling for the Hervey Bay Rotary Club at the Local Ambulance Committee Goods Wheel for over 35 years - a role close to his heart.

The History of Rotary

February 23, 1905. The airplane had yet to stay aloft more than a few minutes. The first motion picture theatre had not yet opened. Norway and Sweden were peacefully terminating their union.

Rotary-Club-of-Hervey-Bay-City-History-Paul

Paul Harris

On this particular day, a Chicago lawyer, Paul P. Harris, called three friends to a meeting. What he had in mind was a club that would kindle fellowship among members of the business community. It was an idea that grew from his desire to find within the large city the kind of friendly spirit that he knew in the villages where he grew up.

The four businessmen didn’t decide then to call themselves a Rotary club, but their get-together was, in fact, the first meeting of the worlds first Rotary club. As they continued to meet, adding others to the group, they rotated their meetings among the members’ places of business, hence the name. Soon after the club name was agreed upon, one of the new members suggested a wagon wheel design as the club emblem. It was the precursor of the familiar cogwheel emblem now worn by Rotarians around the world. By the end of 1905, the club had 30 members.

The four businessmen didn’t decide then to call themselves a Rotary club, but their get-together was, in fact, the first meeting of the worlds first Rotary club. As they continued to meet, adding others to the group, they rotated their meetings among the members’ places of business, hence the name. Soon after the club name was agreed upon, one of the new members suggested a wagon wheel design as the club emblem. It was the precursor of the familiar cogwheel emblem now worn by Rotarians around the world. By the end of 1905, the club had 30 members.

The second Rotary club was formed in 1908 half a continent away from Chicago in San Francisco, California. It was a much shorter leap across San Francisco Bay to Oakland, California, where the third club was formed. Others followed in Seattle, Washington, Los Angeles, California, and New York City, New York. Rotary became international in 1910 when a club was formed in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. By 1912 the organisation was represented on every continent, and the name Rotary International was adopted in 1922.

What is now The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International grew from a small endowment fund started in 1917. It became the Rotary Foundation in 1928 but grew only modestly until 1947 when it received a number of gifts in memory of Paul Harris upon his death on January 27 of that year. Accelerated growth in recent years has made it a major source of activities to provide humanitarian assistance, to enhance education and promote international understanding and peace. Since 1917, contributions to the foundation total $824.3 million including $61.7 million in 1994-95.

A major source of the foundations recent growth, and Rotary’s increasing membership, has been the burgeoning of the Rotary movement in Asia. Also growing is the number of new Rotary clubs in the countries formerly in the Communist-government bloc of Eastern Europe. Countries where there were no Rotary clubs in 1987 now have more than 220.

Among programs that Rotary has undertaken in recent years, the largest is Polio-Plus, whose goal is the education of the disease Polio throughout the world. To achieve that goal, Rotary is working in coalition with the World Health Organisation, UNICEF, the U.S Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, And the Task Force For Child Survival and Development, supplying funds for vaccine purchase and manpower for Polio immunization campaigns in polioendemic countries. If the Disease is eradicated by the year 2005, the achievement will be certified in time for Rotary to celebrate the 100th anniversary of its birthday in a polio free world.

Rotary-Club-of-Hervey-Bay-City-History-6 Rotary-Club-of-Hervey-Bay-City-History-7

ROTARY
Hervey Bay City

Contact Information

PO Box 460, Pialba,
Queensland, 4655

0435 030 920

(Club Secretary)

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